Simple, Secure Password Generator

Generate Random Secure Passwords - Free!

These days the old standard of 8-digit passwords made up of letters and numbers is just all too easy for someone to hack. We all need to improve our passwords on a technical level.

The use of 'random' passwords which incorporate upper and lower case letters, numbers and ASCII characters is highly recommended and can mean the difference between a hacker gaining access to your online life in as little as a few seconds, or giving up as it would take too long. The passwords generated on this website can contain letters, numbers and characters, and can be up to 32 digits long. As such they are much more secure than shorter passwords that may contain actual words, or just letters/numbers. You can generate passwords in bulk, up to 30 at a time.

Passwordr.net was built to help you start using much more secure passwords, and encourage the use of encrypted password managers such as KeePass. After all, your password is only secure if you don't leave it open to discovery. No passwords generated are ever logged or recorded, and there are literally millions of generated variations.

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Password Generator Tips:

  • Longer passwords are more difficult to crack or guess
  • A strong password should contain at least 8 characters with numbers, lowercase characters and uppercase characters
  • None of your personal data will be collected using this password generator
  • Test Generated Passwords with our Password Strength Tester

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The Benefits of Our Generated Passwords

Random strings mixing upper and lower case letters, numbers and ASCII characters up to 32 digits long stop the threat of dictionary attacks

Literally millions of character combinations are available through our random password generator, so the likelihood of a duplicate password being generated is virtually nil

Passwords you generate are not recorded or stored anywhere, and this service is totally anonymous. Generate up to 30 passwords at a time

Enjoy the safeguards of using unique highly secure, almost-impossible-to-crack passwords for all of your online accounts

Generated Passwords Feature:

Every secure password generated comes with the following great security features, built in!

  • Minimum 8, maximum 32 Characters Length
  • Randomised upper and lower case letters
  • Randomised numbers
  • Non-numeric & non-alphabetic ASCII characters
  • Safeguarded against dictionary attacks and brute force password cracking!
  • Our generated passwords would typically take around 300,000 years to crack on a desktop computer - test passwords with our password strength testing tool now!

Remembering Your Passwords

As you may know already, you should not use the same password for more than one online service - this way, if you ever have an account compromised, the atatcker will only be able to access that one account, rather than easily taking over your entire online identity.

Obviously it would be impossible to remember potentially hundreds of 16-digit random password strings - this is where securely encrypted password managers come in.

For safe, secure management of your paswords, we recommend the following services. Note that for security, you should NEVER keep your passwords written down on your computer or physically, in plain text. Learn more about password cracking here.

A password manager will typically encrypt your password into hashes which no one can view unless they have a key. This level of encryption is to all practical intents and purposes 'unbreakable' at least in the civilian market. You can read more about security, and how your passwords are stored in encrytped form on the KeePass website.

Recommended Password Managers

  • KeePass - Free, open source - our #1 choice
  • LastPass - Free or premium versions
  • OnePass - Premium, trial available
  • RoboForm - Premium, trial available

Password Security Tips

Creating a Strong Password

A strong password is an important protection to help you have safer online transactions. Here are steps you can take to create a strong password. Some or all might help protect your online transactions:

  • Length. Make your passwords long, they should be at LEAST 12 characters long and preferably more.
  • Complexity. Include letters, punctuation, symbols, and numbers. Use the entire keyboard, not just the letters and characters you use or see most often. The greater the variety of characters in your password, the better. However, password hacking software automatically checks for common letter-to-symbol conversions, such as changing "and" to "&" or "to" to "2."
  • Variation. To keep strong passwords effective, change them often. Set an automatic reminder for yourself to change your passwords on your email, banking, and credit card websites about every three months.
  • Variety. Don't use the same password for everything. Cybercriminals steal passwords on websites that have very little security, and then they use that same password and user name in more secure environments, such as banking websites.

Avoid Common Password Mistakes

Hackers use sophisticated automated tools that can rapidly decipher passwords, such as John The Ripper. Don't make it easy for someone to crack your password!

For example, a couple of years back Gawker Media [owner of various popular blogs and sites such as Lifehacker] got hacked. Horrifyingly, 2516 Gawker account holders used "123456" as a password, while another 2188 used "password" for a password. You get the idea.

Avoid creating passwords that use any or all of the following:

  • Don't use only letters or only numbers.
  • Dictionary words in any language.
  • Words spelled backwards, common misspellings, and abbreviations.
  • Sequences or repeated characters. Examples: 12345678, 222222, abcdefg, or adjacent letters on your keyboard (qwerty).
  • Personal information. Your name, birthday, driver's license, passport number, or similar information.
  • Don't use names of spouses, children, girlfriends/boyfriends or pets.
  • Don't use the same word as your username, or any variation of it.

Long Passwords Are Better

The truth here is that password security depends heavily on the attack method. Dictionary attacks can crack different passwords than brute-force attacks. People often think of a short set of random characters like "*K>#)0$j4" as super secure, but a long string of memorable words like "golfkangaroocrispyhalitosis" can actually be just as strong!

The reason has everything to do with password entropy: a representation of how much uncertainty there is in a password. This translates to how computationally difficult a password is to crack. Simply put, adding length increases entropy.

It is also important for users to use random text in passwords, like 'golf kangaroo crispy halitosis', which is comprised of words with no obvious correlation. Using people's names, repeating characters, sequential numbers or well-known keyboard entries like 'qwerty' are expected - just the opposite of random.

We recommend you check out this great XKCD comic strip for further illustration :) When enforcing passwords, prioritize length and random text. Better still, aim for both!

Bite-Size Password Security Tips

  • Make sure you use different passwords for each of your accounts.
  • Be sure no one watches when you enter your password.
  • Always log off if you leave your device and anyone is around - it only takes a moment for someone to steal or change the password.
  • Use comprehensive security software and keep it up to date to avoid keyloggers (keystroke loggers) and other malware.
  • Avoid entering passwords on computers you don't control (like computers at an Internet cafe or library) - they may have malware that steals your passwords.
  • Avoid entering passwords when using unsecured Wi-Fi connections (like at the airport or coffee shop) - hackers can intercept your passwords and data over this unsecured connection.
  • Don't tell anyone your password. Your trusted friend now might not be your friend in the future. Keep your passwords safe by keeping them to yourself.
  • Depending on the sensitivity of the information being protected, you should change your passwords periodically, and avoid reusing a password for at least one year.
  • Do use at least ten characters of lowercase and uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols in your password. Remember, the more [and varied] characters, the harder it is to crack.

How Your Passwords Get Cracked

Dictionary attacks: Avoid consecutive keyboard combinations— such as qwerty or asdfg. Don't use dictionary words, slang terms, common misspellings, or words spelled backward. These cracks rely on software that automatically plugs common words into password fields. Password cracking becomes almost effortless with a tool like John the Ripper or similar programs.

Cracking security questions: Many people use first names as passwords, usually the names of spouses, kids, other relatives, or pets, all of which can be deduced with a little research. When you click the "forgot password" link within a webmail service or other site, you’re asked to answer a question or series of questions. The answers can often be found on your social media profile. This is how Sarah Palin’s Yahoo account was hacked.

Simple passwords: Don't use personal information such as your name, age, birth date, child's name, pet's name, or favorite color/song, etc. When 32 million passwords were exposed in a breach last year, almost 1% of victims were using "123456". The next most popular password was "12345." Other common choices are "111111", "princess", "qwerty", and "abc123". Reuse of passwords across multiple sites: Reusing passwords for email, banking, and social media accounts can lead to identity theft. Two recent breaches revealed a password reuse rate of 31% among victims.

Social engineering: Social engineering is an elaborate type of lying. An alternative to traditional hacking, it is the act of manipulating others into performing certain actions or divulging confidential information.

Third-party sites get hacked: Twitter, Sony, Living Social, Gawker, Evernote - the list of huge online companies who have had their user data hacked is growing. Obviously, there is nothing you can do personally to prevent this, but to safeguard against it you MUST use differrent passwords for the online services you use. This will mitigate the risk and stop a hacker from easily stealing your online accounts en masse.

Note: Passwords generated on this website are not a guarantee of your online security!